The Cell (2000)

#HolyMotherJLo

No More Excuses (1968)

No More Excuses (1968)

Hubba Hubba: Susan Sarandon

Hubba Hubba: Susan Sarandon

Best of Netflix Watch Instantly: We Are What We Are (2013)
Americans tend to think we can do everything better than our foreign counterparts. Movies are one of our favorite challenges, and the horror genre seems to garner extra brownie points. These attempts have been met with mixed results: “Two snaps and a twist” to Let Me In and The Ring to name a few and a big “Hated it!” to The Eye, and One Missed Call amongst many, many others. Director Jim Mickle takes recent Spanish horror film Somos lo que hay and weaves a dark building story that reads more like a character drama with a secret. We Are What We Are owes a great deal of its success to the cast: lead by an overbearing father Frank Parker played by Bill Sage, and rounded out by his daughters, newcomers Julia Garner and Ambyr Childers. Cinematographer Ryan Samul makes the Catskills look like a grey, rainy place that I would NOT be interested in Airbnb-ing anytime soon. Everything is washed over in hues of grey and brown and when we meet the Parkers, they all look like they could use some vitamin E, a green juice, and that Sephora was having a Beauty Insider sale on scarlet eye shadows that make you look like absolute shit.
[[MORE]]
The film centers around a small family, whose mother dies while running errands during a flood. Father Parker looks on to the daughters: Iris and Rose to carry on with family traditions, but he doesn’t mean unloading the dishwasher or taking out the garbage. First step: Dress like Sister Wives. Then there’s a mysterious meal that mom always made, and the ingredients are not approved by the USDA. I wanted to scream “Soylent Green is people!” but this was more of a stew or the consistency of Wendy’s chili so I just thought “NOPE”. As the sisters prepare to take place in the sinister ritual they want to rebel and run away but know that their father will stop at nothing to remain true to their beliefs: archaic and illegal as they might be. Meanwhile back at the ranch, a newsy doctor is closing in on them, suspecting that the Parkers may be linked to missing persons cases in the area. Will Doc Barrow catch them before its time to find another victim? What is the proper wine pairing for meal made with people? And will it ever stop raining in the Catskills? Watch and you’ll find out! I really enjoyed We Are What We Are, it had very creepy moments peppered in, inspired acting and atmosphere and the ending is insane in the best way. Its a nice palate cleanser to all of the torture porn, ghost stories, and found footage that has flooded horror. And let’s be honest, wondering what your mysterious neighbors are up to is pretty damn scary.

Best of Netflix Watch Instantly: We Are What We Are (2013)

Americans tend to think we can do everything better than our foreign counterparts. Movies are one of our favorite challenges, and the horror genre seems to garner extra brownie points. These attempts have been met with mixed results: “Two snaps and a twist” to Let Me In and The Ring to name a few and a big “Hated it!” to The Eye, and One Missed Call amongst many, many others. Director Jim Mickle takes recent Spanish horror film Somos lo que hay and weaves a dark building story that reads more like a character drama with a secret. We Are What We Are owes a great deal of its success to the cast: lead by an overbearing father Frank Parker played by Bill Sage, and rounded out by his daughters, newcomers Julia Garner and Ambyr Childers. Cinematographer Ryan Samul makes the Catskills look like a grey, rainy place that I would NOT be interested in Airbnb-ing anytime soon. Everything is washed over in hues of grey and brown and when we meet the Parkers, they all look like they could use some vitamin E, a green juice, and that Sephora was having a Beauty Insider sale on scarlet eye shadows that make you look like absolute shit.

Read More

Things to Do: David Lynch in Conversation at BAM 4/29
Oh. My. God. You. Guyyyysss. David Lynch will be speaking at BAM!? I’d like to queue both the Mad Decent air horn and the sound of a thousand Oprahs screaming because I am SO excited. Lynch will be making a rare appearance to chat with New York Public Library’s director of public programs Paul Holdengräber about his non celluloid related passions including Transcendental Meditation, the creative process, his films, and if we’re lucky who his barber is! Tickets go on sale tomorrow morning at 10am!
Tue, Apr 29, 2014 at 8pmPeter Jay Sharp Building BAM Howard Gilman Opera HouseTICKETS START AT  $25
see more info here.

Things to Do: David Lynch in Conversation at BAM 4/29

Oh. My. God. You. Guyyyysss. David Lynch will be speaking at BAM!? I’d like to queue both the Mad Decent air horn and the sound of a thousand Oprahs screaming because I am SO excited. Lynch will be making a rare appearance to chat with New York Public Library’s director of public programs Paul Holdengräber about his non celluloid related passions including Transcendental Meditation, the creative process, his films, and if we’re lucky who his barber is! Tickets go on sale tomorrow morning at 10am!

Tue, Apr 29, 2014 at 8pm
Peter Jay Sharp Building
BAM Howard Gilman Opera House
TICKETS START AT  $25

see more info here.

Hubba Hubba: Jane Fonda

Hubba Hubba: Jane Fonda

The Howling (1981)
This is how I feel when the cashier at McDonald’s tells me that I have to pay for extra Sweet N’ Sour sauce.

The Howling (1981)

This is how I feel when the cashier at McDonald’s tells me that I have to pay for extra Sweet N’ Sour sauce.

Under the Skin (2014)
This feeling was familiar. It first happened to me roughly five years ago when I saw Gaspar Noé’s Enter The Void. As the credits began to roll I sat frozen in my seat, it was as if I had melted into the polyester cushion and was simply a wig and some clothes tossed onto a chair. I felt empty, but mostly angry. As the final images of Under the Skin flickered on screen it came to me again: the emptiness. The title cards hit like a thud and as I looked over at my friend her face held my same stunned contemplation. “Whoa. What just happened?” we both asked as we drowsily walked out of the sticky theater. I felt so disoriented, in a fog. Scarlett Johansson had taken our souls just like all of the helpless Scottish blokes in the film. But whyyyyyy?

Under the Skin is an experience, a sometimes gorgeous albeit frustrating one. Coming in just shy of two hours, it somehow felt like I had been in the theater for far longer. Some scenes continued for more than needed, especially considering they offered little information to the viewer. I was lost in the landscape, confused, wandering just like Johansson’s subhuman character drifted around Scotland. My biggest gripe was that the only reason I (kinda) knew what was going on was because I have a masochistic love of spoilers and I regularly go kerplunking deep into the corners of the internet. A friend recently told me that she learned from a Q&A with the director that he purposely went down this path: the film is not supposed to be clear, and he was ok with that. The only problem is, if someone didn’t know what this film was about I don’t know if I would recommend it. But say you like a dreamy and confusing mood piece, then you will love this film. Said mood is perfected by  Daniel Landin’s cinematography and the the world we are introduced to is cold, dark and damp. The ideal breeding ground  for something that may or may not be human.
Johansson deserves a gold star for commitment here. She’s gone full art house, and I’m sure you’ve heard: fully nude. She has few lines, and many scenes that require her face (and body) to reveal clues to her story. It felt reminiscent of Ryan Gosling’s turn in Drive. Underneath the tousled raven hair, acid washed jeggings and coral lipstick she still looks stunning. And whether she is a real woman or not she sure knows how to use her power. I kept thinking of the line from The Graduate (by way of George Michael’s Too Funky) “Would you like me to seduce you? Is that what you’re trying to tell me?” She’s in control, revealing a smile, some skin, or humanity to get these men to enter what I’ll liken to a reflective venus fly trap. As a child of the Hype Williams era of music videos (the BEST era of music videos) these scenes were so seductive and brilliantly shot. As Scarlet softly walked backwards, Mica Levi’s score builds and the men move forward, tongues wagging and boners saluting in anticipation. Ugh, it was perfect. I needed an e-cigarette. These scenes left me wanting more but then the film just ended and I thought “huh?”. She teased us like those men and I felt at least a little cheated. You could have at least bought me a drink Scarlett!
Twenty four hours later I am glad that I saw Under the Skin, and if you’re patient, I think you will enjoy it too. If nothing else a nude Scarlett Johansson is enough thinspiration to get you through Spring.

Under the Skin (2014)

This feeling was familiar. It first happened to me roughly five years ago when I saw Gaspar Noé’s Enter The Void. As the credits began to roll I sat frozen in my seat, it was as if I had melted into the polyester cushion and was simply a wig and some clothes tossed onto a chair. I felt empty, but mostly angry. As the final images of Under the Skin flickered on screen it came to me again: the emptiness. The title cards hit like a thud and as I looked over at my friend her face held my same stunned contemplation. “Whoa. What just happened?” we both asked as we drowsily walked out of the sticky theater. I felt so disoriented, in a fog. Scarlett Johansson had taken our souls just like all of the helpless Scottish blokes in the film. But whyyyyyy?

Read More

À nos amours (1983)

À nos amours (1983)

Welcome to the Dollhouse (1995)
Tonight I saw Heather Matarazzo at a MoMa screening and nearly wept at her feet to proclaim my love for this movie. In reality I nibbled on a trail mix cookie and stared at her like a creeper while basically chanting to my friend “Heather Matarazzo is over there!”. Michael Shannon was there too, so I am obviously typing this from the grave.

Welcome to the Dollhouse (1995)

Tonight I saw Heather Matarazzo at a MoMa screening and nearly wept at her feet to proclaim my love for this movie. In reality I nibbled on a trail mix cookie and stared at her like a creeper while basically chanting to my friend “Heather Matarazzo is over there!”. Michael Shannon was there too, so I am obviously typing this from the grave.

Jack Nicholson by Willy Rizzo

Jack Nicholson by Willy Rizzo

Moonrise Kingdom (2012)
Wes Anderson on the set on Moonrise Kingdom.

Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

Wes Anderson on the set on Moonrise Kingdom.

Thief (1981)

Thief (1981)

Under The Skin (2014) 

Under The Skin (2014) 

Big Trouble in Little China (1986)

Big Trouble in Little China (1986)

No More Excuses (1968)

No More Excuses (1968)

Hubba Hubba: Susan Sarandon

Hubba Hubba: Susan Sarandon

Best of Netflix Watch Instantly: We Are What We Are (2013)
Americans tend to think we can do everything better than our foreign counterparts. Movies are one of our favorite challenges, and the horror genre seems to garner extra brownie points. These attempts have been met with mixed results: “Two snaps and a twist” to Let Me In and The Ring to name a few and a big “Hated it!” to The Eye, and One Missed Call amongst many, many others. Director Jim Mickle takes recent Spanish horror film Somos lo que hay and weaves a dark building story that reads more like a character drama with a secret. We Are What We Are owes a great deal of its success to the cast: lead by an overbearing father Frank Parker played by Bill Sage, and rounded out by his daughters, newcomers Julia Garner and Ambyr Childers. Cinematographer Ryan Samul makes the Catskills look like a grey, rainy place that I would NOT be interested in Airbnb-ing anytime soon. Everything is washed over in hues of grey and brown and when we meet the Parkers, they all look like they could use some vitamin E, a green juice, and that Sephora was having a Beauty Insider sale on scarlet eye shadows that make you look like absolute shit.
[[MORE]]
The film centers around a small family, whose mother dies while running errands during a flood. Father Parker looks on to the daughters: Iris and Rose to carry on with family traditions, but he doesn’t mean unloading the dishwasher or taking out the garbage. First step: Dress like Sister Wives. Then there’s a mysterious meal that mom always made, and the ingredients are not approved by the USDA. I wanted to scream “Soylent Green is people!” but this was more of a stew or the consistency of Wendy’s chili so I just thought “NOPE”. As the sisters prepare to take place in the sinister ritual they want to rebel and run away but know that their father will stop at nothing to remain true to their beliefs: archaic and illegal as they might be. Meanwhile back at the ranch, a newsy doctor is closing in on them, suspecting that the Parkers may be linked to missing persons cases in the area. Will Doc Barrow catch them before its time to find another victim? What is the proper wine pairing for meal made with people? And will it ever stop raining in the Catskills? Watch and you’ll find out! I really enjoyed We Are What We Are, it had very creepy moments peppered in, inspired acting and atmosphere and the ending is insane in the best way. Its a nice palate cleanser to all of the torture porn, ghost stories, and found footage that has flooded horror. And let’s be honest, wondering what your mysterious neighbors are up to is pretty damn scary.

Best of Netflix Watch Instantly: We Are What We Are (2013)

Americans tend to think we can do everything better than our foreign counterparts. Movies are one of our favorite challenges, and the horror genre seems to garner extra brownie points. These attempts have been met with mixed results: “Two snaps and a twist” to Let Me In and The Ring to name a few and a big “Hated it!” to The Eye, and One Missed Call amongst many, many others. Director Jim Mickle takes recent Spanish horror film Somos lo que hay and weaves a dark building story that reads more like a character drama with a secret. We Are What We Are owes a great deal of its success to the cast: lead by an overbearing father Frank Parker played by Bill Sage, and rounded out by his daughters, newcomers Julia Garner and Ambyr Childers. Cinematographer Ryan Samul makes the Catskills look like a grey, rainy place that I would NOT be interested in Airbnb-ing anytime soon. Everything is washed over in hues of grey and brown and when we meet the Parkers, they all look like they could use some vitamin E, a green juice, and that Sephora was having a Beauty Insider sale on scarlet eye shadows that make you look like absolute shit.

Read More

Things to Do: David Lynch in Conversation at BAM 4/29
Oh. My. God. You. Guyyyysss. David Lynch will be speaking at BAM!? I’d like to queue both the Mad Decent air horn and the sound of a thousand Oprahs screaming because I am SO excited. Lynch will be making a rare appearance to chat with New York Public Library’s director of public programs Paul Holdengräber about his non celluloid related passions including Transcendental Meditation, the creative process, his films, and if we’re lucky who his barber is! Tickets go on sale tomorrow morning at 10am!
Tue, Apr 29, 2014 at 8pmPeter Jay Sharp Building BAM Howard Gilman Opera HouseTICKETS START AT  $25
see more info here.

Things to Do: David Lynch in Conversation at BAM 4/29

Oh. My. God. You. Guyyyysss. David Lynch will be speaking at BAM!? I’d like to queue both the Mad Decent air horn and the sound of a thousand Oprahs screaming because I am SO excited. Lynch will be making a rare appearance to chat with New York Public Library’s director of public programs Paul Holdengräber about his non celluloid related passions including Transcendental Meditation, the creative process, his films, and if we’re lucky who his barber is! Tickets go on sale tomorrow morning at 10am!

Tue, Apr 29, 2014 at 8pm
Peter Jay Sharp Building
BAM Howard Gilman Opera House
TICKETS START AT  $25

see more info here.

Hubba Hubba: Jane Fonda

Hubba Hubba: Jane Fonda

The Howling (1981)
This is how I feel when the cashier at McDonald’s tells me that I have to pay for extra Sweet N’ Sour sauce.

The Howling (1981)

This is how I feel when the cashier at McDonald’s tells me that I have to pay for extra Sweet N’ Sour sauce.

Under the Skin (2014)
This feeling was familiar. It first happened to me roughly five years ago when I saw Gaspar Noé’s Enter The Void. As the credits began to roll I sat frozen in my seat, it was as if I had melted into the polyester cushion and was simply a wig and some clothes tossed onto a chair. I felt empty, but mostly angry. As the final images of Under the Skin flickered on screen it came to me again: the emptiness. The title cards hit like a thud and as I looked over at my friend her face held my same stunned contemplation. “Whoa. What just happened?” we both asked as we drowsily walked out of the sticky theater. I felt so disoriented, in a fog. Scarlett Johansson had taken our souls just like all of the helpless Scottish blokes in the film. But whyyyyyy?

Under the Skin is an experience, a sometimes gorgeous albeit frustrating one. Coming in just shy of two hours, it somehow felt like I had been in the theater for far longer. Some scenes continued for more than needed, especially considering they offered little information to the viewer. I was lost in the landscape, confused, wandering just like Johansson’s subhuman character drifted around Scotland. My biggest gripe was that the only reason I (kinda) knew what was going on was because I have a masochistic love of spoilers and I regularly go kerplunking deep into the corners of the internet. A friend recently told me that she learned from a Q&A with the director that he purposely went down this path: the film is not supposed to be clear, and he was ok with that. The only problem is, if someone didn’t know what this film was about I don’t know if I would recommend it. But say you like a dreamy and confusing mood piece, then you will love this film. Said mood is perfected by  Daniel Landin’s cinematography and the the world we are introduced to is cold, dark and damp. The ideal breeding ground  for something that may or may not be human.
Johansson deserves a gold star for commitment here. She’s gone full art house, and I’m sure you’ve heard: fully nude. She has few lines, and many scenes that require her face (and body) to reveal clues to her story. It felt reminiscent of Ryan Gosling’s turn in Drive. Underneath the tousled raven hair, acid washed jeggings and coral lipstick she still looks stunning. And whether she is a real woman or not she sure knows how to use her power. I kept thinking of the line from The Graduate (by way of George Michael’s Too Funky) “Would you like me to seduce you? Is that what you’re trying to tell me?” She’s in control, revealing a smile, some skin, or humanity to get these men to enter what I’ll liken to a reflective venus fly trap. As a child of the Hype Williams era of music videos (the BEST era of music videos) these scenes were so seductive and brilliantly shot. As Scarlet softly walked backwards, Mica Levi’s score builds and the men move forward, tongues wagging and boners saluting in anticipation. Ugh, it was perfect. I needed an e-cigarette. These scenes left me wanting more but then the film just ended and I thought “huh?”. She teased us like those men and I felt at least a little cheated. You could have at least bought me a drink Scarlett!
Twenty four hours later I am glad that I saw Under the Skin, and if you’re patient, I think you will enjoy it too. If nothing else a nude Scarlett Johansson is enough thinspiration to get you through Spring.

Under the Skin (2014)

This feeling was familiar. It first happened to me roughly five years ago when I saw Gaspar Noé’s Enter The Void. As the credits began to roll I sat frozen in my seat, it was as if I had melted into the polyester cushion and was simply a wig and some clothes tossed onto a chair. I felt empty, but mostly angry. As the final images of Under the Skin flickered on screen it came to me again: the emptiness. The title cards hit like a thud and as I looked over at my friend her face held my same stunned contemplation. “Whoa. What just happened?” we both asked as we drowsily walked out of the sticky theater. I felt so disoriented, in a fog. Scarlett Johansson had taken our souls just like all of the helpless Scottish blokes in the film. But whyyyyyy?

Read More

À nos amours (1983)

À nos amours (1983)

Welcome to the Dollhouse (1995)
Tonight I saw Heather Matarazzo at a MoMa screening and nearly wept at her feet to proclaim my love for this movie. In reality I nibbled on a trail mix cookie and stared at her like a creeper while basically chanting to my friend “Heather Matarazzo is over there!”. Michael Shannon was there too, so I am obviously typing this from the grave.

Welcome to the Dollhouse (1995)

Tonight I saw Heather Matarazzo at a MoMa screening and nearly wept at her feet to proclaim my love for this movie. In reality I nibbled on a trail mix cookie and stared at her like a creeper while basically chanting to my friend “Heather Matarazzo is over there!”. Michael Shannon was there too, so I am obviously typing this from the grave.

Jack Nicholson by Willy Rizzo

Jack Nicholson by Willy Rizzo

Moonrise Kingdom (2012)
Wes Anderson on the set on Moonrise Kingdom.

Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

Wes Anderson on the set on Moonrise Kingdom.

Thief (1981)

Thief (1981)

Under The Skin (2014) 

Under The Skin (2014) 

Big Trouble in Little China (1986)

Big Trouble in Little China (1986)