Dracula (1992)
This could be us but you playin.

Dracula (1992)

This could be us but you playin.

Harry Dean Stanton by Chris Buck

Harry Dean Stanton by Chris Buck

Suspiria (1977)

Suspiria (1977)

Julie Delpy by Stéphane Coutelle (1990)

The Limits of Control (2009)

(Source: blogdesebit, via jaysonscottmusson)

Vamp (1986)
Grace Jones being painted by Keith Haring on the set of Vamp.

Vamp (1986)

Grace Jones being painted by Keith Haring on the set of Vamp.

Nine 1/2 Weeks (1986)
Haters gonna hate but Nine 1/2 Weeks will always be one of my favorite Adrian Lyne movies. For all the sexxxy sex scenes that were controversial at the time (read: very hot) the characters feel believable thanks to its fearless leads. Kim Bassinger has never been more beautiful or more vulnerable than she is here and it doesn’t hurt that its grogreously shot and that 80s New York is a supporting character.
[[MORE]]















If Nine 1/2 Weeks were to come out today, this would be one of its memes.

Nine 1/2 Weeks (1986)

Haters gonna hate but Nine 1/2 Weeks will always be one of my favorite Adrian Lyne movies. For all the sexxxy sex scenes that were controversial at the time (read: very hot) the characters feel believable thanks to its fearless leads. Kim Bassinger has never been more beautiful or more vulnerable than she is here and it doesn’t hurt that its grogreously shot and that 80s New York is a supporting character.

Read More

Persona (1966)
That is a sexy letter “O” if I ever saw one.

Persona (1966)

That is a sexy letter “O” if I ever saw one.


Drew Tinnin has one of my many dream jobs. No, he’s not Waka Flocka’s blunt roller, nor is he the person who designs the graphics for local news station stories or the person who takes (and edits) Kim Kardashian’s selfies… He’s a movie critic! Better yet a movie critic that specializes in horror movies (!!!) When I first met Drew, who is now the boyfriend of one of my very best friends I had to hide the pangs of jealousy that rushed over me. Drew was doing the thing I day dream (very often) of doing full time: Writing about film. I had only met an actual film critic once while taking a class at NYU and I felt the same rockstar awe with him. I’m a nerd in that way. Drew is one of the most knowledgeable people I have ever discussed movies with, but he’s not the guy to give you the heavy sigh oh-my-god pretentious “How have you not seen this movie?” guilt trips and is so good at giving recommendations. Here in honor of Halloween is Drew’s The Perfect Ten of movies featuring scary kids. If you live in Brooklyn or you are a person with eyes and ears you have at least once encountered a scary kid. The kids in these movies are demonic, murderous, evil and at the very least downright creepy. What was that? I think that was the sound of my birth control alarm calling. I should probably get that. [[MORE]]

Beware! Children at Play (1989)
These aren’t children…They are demons!
Shot during the golden era of Troma, Beware! Children at Play tells the tale of a group of cannibalistic zombie children who terrorize a small town mainly due to their unhealthy obsession with the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf (yes, you read that right). Danny Mclaughlin, in his only film credit, plays a kind of angst ridden tweener version of Grendel, who after dining on his father begins recruiting (ok, kidnapping) the local rug rats into his flesh-eating cult.

Trick ‘r Treat (2007)
Tagline: Poison, drowning, claw, or knife. So many ways to take a life.
This next flick is a controversial choice (not unlike that last one), namely because its a straight-to-DVD (shameful) anthology featuring a mysterious apparition that floats in and out of each story. Sam is the spirit of Halloween, and he only slices and dices in one of the stories involving the crabby Mr. Kreeg (Brian Cox) - a curmudgeon who gets his comeuppance for refusing to hand out candy to trick-or-treaters.

The Spirit of the Beehive (1973)
Víctor Erice directed this masterpiece that is widely regarded as the greatest Spanish film of the 1970s. A moving picture show travels through the Spanish countryside in 1940 showing the original Frankenstein. When the projectionist arrives in the small village where Ana (Ana Torrent) and her older sister Isabel (Isabel Tellería) reside, the two of them attend, but Anna finds herself profoundly affected by the film - specifically the scenes of the monster killing a small girl and then being lynched by the townspeople at the end.

The Bad Seed (1956)
Tagline:  A woman’s shame…Out in the open!
You know how old doo-wop songs like Thurston Harris’ "Little Bitty Pretty One" seem to develop a more ominous tone the older they get? Rhoda is like that for me: she’s charmingly cherubic, she has pigtails, and she’s in black & white (Eek!). As the film unfolds, the true nature of Rhoda Penmark begins to surface, and it’s not pretty.

The Children (2008)
Tagline: You brought them into this world. Now…They will take you out.
You might want to re-think having kids after seeing the British horror film The Children directed by Tom Shankland. It is certainly the best advertisement for contraception ever committed to celluloid.

Pet Sematary (1989)
Tagline: Sometimes dead is better.
If I die prematurely after getting hit by a truck (which is a real possibility here in NYC), please do not re-animate me in a magical Indian burial ground. *Editor’s note: I even have a soft spot for the Edward Furlong helmed sequel.

Village of the Damned (1960)
Tagline: Beware the eyes that paralyze!
A cautionary tale of totalitarian Aryan Gestapo kids and the terror they can wield, Village of the Damned is classic ’60s horror. What’s even more horrifying to me is the idea that all of the women of childbearing age inexplicably become pregnant.

Kill Baby, Kill (1966)
Tagline: This little girl has nothing else to do but… KILL!
Ever been haunted by a mysterious little girl that makes some people bleed to death and drives others to suicide? Me neither. Luckily, watching Kill Baby, Kill is perfectly safe, provided you’re at home and seated in a very sturdy chair.

It’s Alive (1974)
Tagline: Whatever it is, it’s alive and deadly.
Larry Cohen. Rick Baker. Bernard Herrmann. You should already be heading to the video store. *Editor’s note: Drew, (snickers) video stores don’t exist anymore! JK, JK. The only shitty part of editing this story is that I had to look at this image about six times. It can’t be unseen. 

Bloody Birthday (1981)
Tagline: The nightmare begins with the kids next door.
I don’t really believe in astrology, but I’ve never met anyone born during an eclipse either. The planet Saturn is said to control emotions, so technically speaking, if the Sun and Moon conspire to block the ringed planet, a child born during that few minutes would grow up to be uncaring and potentially sociopathic as a result. Such is the premise of Bloody Birthday, centering around three kids that are born to kill. Literally. Incidentally, the longest eclipse on record during the 21st century occurred on July 22, 2009 and lasted 6 minutes and 39 seconds. Know any kids born on that date?

*Editor’s Note: Golf claps for a few of my favorite scary rugrats. I’d like to give an honorable mention to Isaac in Children of the Corn. Poor kid looked 35 going on 13. Let us not forget the girl in the video in The Ring. You made me never want to watch a VHS video ever again but I will be forever jealous of your hair. What conditioner do you use girl!? And finally Macaulay Culkin's Henry in The Good Son. You weren’t scary as much as you were so insanely manipulative it gave me a scarily strong desire to kick a child (Hey! Don’t judge me). 
Follow Drew on twitter @tinninink and read some of his reviews at Dread Central here.

Drew Tinnin has one of my many dream jobs. No, he’s not Waka Flocka’s blunt roller, nor is he the person who designs the graphics for local news station stories or the person who takes (and edits) Kim Kardashian’s selfies… He’s a movie critic! Better yet a movie critic that specializes in horror movies (!!!) When I first met Drew, who is now the boyfriend of one of my very best friends I had to hide the pangs of jealousy that rushed over me. Drew was doing the thing I day dream (very often) of doing full time: Writing about film. I had only met an actual film critic once while taking a class at NYU and I felt the same rockstar awe with him. I’m a nerd in that way. Drew is one of the most knowledgeable people I have ever discussed movies with, but he’s not the guy to give you the heavy sigh oh-my-god pretentious “How have you not seen this movie?” guilt trips and is so good at giving recommendations. Here in honor of Halloween is Drew’s The Perfect Ten of movies featuring scary kids. If you live in Brooklyn or you are a person with eyes and ears you have at least once encountered a scary kid. The kids in these movies are demonic, murderous, evil and at the very least downright creepy. What was that? I think that was the sound of my birth control alarm calling. I should probably get that.

Read More

The Kiss (Bela Lugosi) (1963)
Screenprint on paper by Andy Warhol currently on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

The Kiss (Bela Lugosi) (1963)

Screenprint on paper by Andy Warhol currently on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Nenette et Boni (1996)

Cinema Paradiso (1990)

Cinema Paradiso (1990)

Best of Netflix: Candyman (1992) 
A good indicator of how scary I find a movie is the setting in which I choose to watch it. I watched Candyman during the day… on a Bolt Bus… on my phone if that gives you any insight. Candyman is a movie that has terrorized me for years. Owing to the fact that I was a scheming child and first watched this alone without my parents consent when I was about ten. I was always sneaking and watching Tales From the Crypt and Red Shoe Diaries but this viewing felt especially rebellious. I regretted this choice immediately when the first person said his name three times. Fuck. Now I am thirty one, in many ways an adult, but still a tiny person that will never say the name Candyman three times in a mirror. Nope. And don’t even get me started on that bitch Bloody Mary.
[[MORE]]So now felt like as good a time as any to re-visit this nightmare from my childhood. At the time, Clive Barker’s decision to plant a boogie man in the projects was very fresh. I was brought up to believe that all of the scary shit that happened in movies took place in the woods or in the suburbs (read: where White people live) so this was really disconcerting. Candyman terrorizing Chicago’s Cabrini-Green housing project works well against Virginia Madsen’s White Lady Saves the Day arc. You know she means well but the whole time you’re thinking “Stop asking people in the hood so many damn questions?!” Of course she doesn’t listen, and her curiosity gets the best and reveals the worst in her. And who knew a man in a lady’s fur coat with a hook hand could make this movie worth watching? Thank you Tony Todd. A touch of class and building drama is rounded out by Philip Glass’ score. Candyman as a whole was not as scary as I remember but it also held up better than I expected. Maybe one day I will be able to say his name three times, but until then I’ll just whisper it safely in my mind.

Best of Netflix: Candyman (1992)

A good indicator of how scary I find a movie is the setting in which I choose to watch it. I watched Candyman during the day… on a Bolt Bus… on my phone if that gives you any insight. Candyman is a movie that has terrorized me for years. Owing to the fact that I was a scheming child and first watched this alone without my parents consent when I was about ten. I was always sneaking and watching Tales From the Crypt and Red Shoe Diaries but this viewing felt especially rebellious. I regretted this choice immediately when the first person said his name three times. Fuck. Now I am thirty one, in many ways an adult, but still a tiny person that will never say the name Candyman three times in a mirror. Nope. And don’t even get me started on that bitch Bloody Mary.

Read More

Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985)

Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985)

The Boy Friend (1971)

Dracula (1992)
This could be us but you playin.

Dracula (1992)

This could be us but you playin.

Harry Dean Stanton by Chris Buck

Harry Dean Stanton by Chris Buck

Suspiria (1977)

Suspiria (1977)

Vamp (1986)
Grace Jones being painted by Keith Haring on the set of Vamp.

Vamp (1986)

Grace Jones being painted by Keith Haring on the set of Vamp.

Nine 1/2 Weeks (1986)
Haters gonna hate but Nine 1/2 Weeks will always be one of my favorite Adrian Lyne movies. For all the sexxxy sex scenes that were controversial at the time (read: very hot) the characters feel believable thanks to its fearless leads. Kim Bassinger has never been more beautiful or more vulnerable than she is here and it doesn’t hurt that its grogreously shot and that 80s New York is a supporting character.
[[MORE]]















If Nine 1/2 Weeks were to come out today, this would be one of its memes.

Nine 1/2 Weeks (1986)

Haters gonna hate but Nine 1/2 Weeks will always be one of my favorite Adrian Lyne movies. For all the sexxxy sex scenes that were controversial at the time (read: very hot) the characters feel believable thanks to its fearless leads. Kim Bassinger has never been more beautiful or more vulnerable than she is here and it doesn’t hurt that its grogreously shot and that 80s New York is a supporting character.

Read More

Persona (1966)
That is a sexy letter “O” if I ever saw one.

Persona (1966)

That is a sexy letter “O” if I ever saw one.


Drew Tinnin has one of my many dream jobs. No, he’s not Waka Flocka’s blunt roller, nor is he the person who designs the graphics for local news station stories or the person who takes (and edits) Kim Kardashian’s selfies… He’s a movie critic! Better yet a movie critic that specializes in horror movies (!!!) When I first met Drew, who is now the boyfriend of one of my very best friends I had to hide the pangs of jealousy that rushed over me. Drew was doing the thing I day dream (very often) of doing full time: Writing about film. I had only met an actual film critic once while taking a class at NYU and I felt the same rockstar awe with him. I’m a nerd in that way. Drew is one of the most knowledgeable people I have ever discussed movies with, but he’s not the guy to give you the heavy sigh oh-my-god pretentious “How have you not seen this movie?” guilt trips and is so good at giving recommendations. Here in honor of Halloween is Drew’s The Perfect Ten of movies featuring scary kids. If you live in Brooklyn or you are a person with eyes and ears you have at least once encountered a scary kid. The kids in these movies are demonic, murderous, evil and at the very least downright creepy. What was that? I think that was the sound of my birth control alarm calling. I should probably get that. [[MORE]]

Beware! Children at Play (1989)
These aren’t children…They are demons!
Shot during the golden era of Troma, Beware! Children at Play tells the tale of a group of cannibalistic zombie children who terrorize a small town mainly due to their unhealthy obsession with the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf (yes, you read that right). Danny Mclaughlin, in his only film credit, plays a kind of angst ridden tweener version of Grendel, who after dining on his father begins recruiting (ok, kidnapping) the local rug rats into his flesh-eating cult.

Trick ‘r Treat (2007)
Tagline: Poison, drowning, claw, or knife. So many ways to take a life.
This next flick is a controversial choice (not unlike that last one), namely because its a straight-to-DVD (shameful) anthology featuring a mysterious apparition that floats in and out of each story. Sam is the spirit of Halloween, and he only slices and dices in one of the stories involving the crabby Mr. Kreeg (Brian Cox) - a curmudgeon who gets his comeuppance for refusing to hand out candy to trick-or-treaters.

The Spirit of the Beehive (1973)
Víctor Erice directed this masterpiece that is widely regarded as the greatest Spanish film of the 1970s. A moving picture show travels through the Spanish countryside in 1940 showing the original Frankenstein. When the projectionist arrives in the small village where Ana (Ana Torrent) and her older sister Isabel (Isabel Tellería) reside, the two of them attend, but Anna finds herself profoundly affected by the film - specifically the scenes of the monster killing a small girl and then being lynched by the townspeople at the end.

The Bad Seed (1956)
Tagline:  A woman’s shame…Out in the open!
You know how old doo-wop songs like Thurston Harris’ "Little Bitty Pretty One" seem to develop a more ominous tone the older they get? Rhoda is like that for me: she’s charmingly cherubic, she has pigtails, and she’s in black & white (Eek!). As the film unfolds, the true nature of Rhoda Penmark begins to surface, and it’s not pretty.

The Children (2008)
Tagline: You brought them into this world. Now…They will take you out.
You might want to re-think having kids after seeing the British horror film The Children directed by Tom Shankland. It is certainly the best advertisement for contraception ever committed to celluloid.

Pet Sematary (1989)
Tagline: Sometimes dead is better.
If I die prematurely after getting hit by a truck (which is a real possibility here in NYC), please do not re-animate me in a magical Indian burial ground. *Editor’s note: I even have a soft spot for the Edward Furlong helmed sequel.

Village of the Damned (1960)
Tagline: Beware the eyes that paralyze!
A cautionary tale of totalitarian Aryan Gestapo kids and the terror they can wield, Village of the Damned is classic ’60s horror. What’s even more horrifying to me is the idea that all of the women of childbearing age inexplicably become pregnant.

Kill Baby, Kill (1966)
Tagline: This little girl has nothing else to do but… KILL!
Ever been haunted by a mysterious little girl that makes some people bleed to death and drives others to suicide? Me neither. Luckily, watching Kill Baby, Kill is perfectly safe, provided you’re at home and seated in a very sturdy chair.

It’s Alive (1974)
Tagline: Whatever it is, it’s alive and deadly.
Larry Cohen. Rick Baker. Bernard Herrmann. You should already be heading to the video store. *Editor’s note: Drew, (snickers) video stores don’t exist anymore! JK, JK. The only shitty part of editing this story is that I had to look at this image about six times. It can’t be unseen. 

Bloody Birthday (1981)
Tagline: The nightmare begins with the kids next door.
I don’t really believe in astrology, but I’ve never met anyone born during an eclipse either. The planet Saturn is said to control emotions, so technically speaking, if the Sun and Moon conspire to block the ringed planet, a child born during that few minutes would grow up to be uncaring and potentially sociopathic as a result. Such is the premise of Bloody Birthday, centering around three kids that are born to kill. Literally. Incidentally, the longest eclipse on record during the 21st century occurred on July 22, 2009 and lasted 6 minutes and 39 seconds. Know any kids born on that date?

*Editor’s Note: Golf claps for a few of my favorite scary rugrats. I’d like to give an honorable mention to Isaac in Children of the Corn. Poor kid looked 35 going on 13. Let us not forget the girl in the video in The Ring. You made me never want to watch a VHS video ever again but I will be forever jealous of your hair. What conditioner do you use girl!? And finally Macaulay Culkin's Henry in The Good Son. You weren’t scary as much as you were so insanely manipulative it gave me a scarily strong desire to kick a child (Hey! Don’t judge me). 
Follow Drew on twitter @tinninink and read some of his reviews at Dread Central here.

Drew Tinnin has one of my many dream jobs. No, he’s not Waka Flocka’s blunt roller, nor is he the person who designs the graphics for local news station stories or the person who takes (and edits) Kim Kardashian’s selfies… He’s a movie critic! Better yet a movie critic that specializes in horror movies (!!!) When I first met Drew, who is now the boyfriend of one of my very best friends I had to hide the pangs of jealousy that rushed over me. Drew was doing the thing I day dream (very often) of doing full time: Writing about film. I had only met an actual film critic once while taking a class at NYU and I felt the same rockstar awe with him. I’m a nerd in that way. Drew is one of the most knowledgeable people I have ever discussed movies with, but he’s not the guy to give you the heavy sigh oh-my-god pretentious “How have you not seen this movie?” guilt trips and is so good at giving recommendations. Here in honor of Halloween is Drew’s The Perfect Ten of movies featuring scary kids. If you live in Brooklyn or you are a person with eyes and ears you have at least once encountered a scary kid. The kids in these movies are demonic, murderous, evil and at the very least downright creepy. What was that? I think that was the sound of my birth control alarm calling. I should probably get that.

Read More

The Kiss (Bela Lugosi) (1963)
Screenprint on paper by Andy Warhol currently on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

The Kiss (Bela Lugosi) (1963)

Screenprint on paper by Andy Warhol currently on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Cinema Paradiso (1990)

Cinema Paradiso (1990)

Best of Netflix: Candyman (1992) 
A good indicator of how scary I find a movie is the setting in which I choose to watch it. I watched Candyman during the day… on a Bolt Bus… on my phone if that gives you any insight. Candyman is a movie that has terrorized me for years. Owing to the fact that I was a scheming child and first watched this alone without my parents consent when I was about ten. I was always sneaking and watching Tales From the Crypt and Red Shoe Diaries but this viewing felt especially rebellious. I regretted this choice immediately when the first person said his name three times. Fuck. Now I am thirty one, in many ways an adult, but still a tiny person that will never say the name Candyman three times in a mirror. Nope. And don’t even get me started on that bitch Bloody Mary.
[[MORE]]So now felt like as good a time as any to re-visit this nightmare from my childhood. At the time, Clive Barker’s decision to plant a boogie man in the projects was very fresh. I was brought up to believe that all of the scary shit that happened in movies took place in the woods or in the suburbs (read: where White people live) so this was really disconcerting. Candyman terrorizing Chicago’s Cabrini-Green housing project works well against Virginia Madsen’s White Lady Saves the Day arc. You know she means well but the whole time you’re thinking “Stop asking people in the hood so many damn questions?!” Of course she doesn’t listen, and her curiosity gets the best and reveals the worst in her. And who knew a man in a lady’s fur coat with a hook hand could make this movie worth watching? Thank you Tony Todd. A touch of class and building drama is rounded out by Philip Glass’ score. Candyman as a whole was not as scary as I remember but it also held up better than I expected. Maybe one day I will be able to say his name three times, but until then I’ll just whisper it safely in my mind.

Best of Netflix: Candyman (1992)

A good indicator of how scary I find a movie is the setting in which I choose to watch it. I watched Candyman during the day… on a Bolt Bus… on my phone if that gives you any insight. Candyman is a movie that has terrorized me for years. Owing to the fact that I was a scheming child and first watched this alone without my parents consent when I was about ten. I was always sneaking and watching Tales From the Crypt and Red Shoe Diaries but this viewing felt especially rebellious. I regretted this choice immediately when the first person said his name three times. Fuck. Now I am thirty one, in many ways an adult, but still a tiny person that will never say the name Candyman three times in a mirror. Nope. And don’t even get me started on that bitch Bloody Mary.

Read More

Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985)

Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985)